1924 Huguenot Walloon Tercentenary Half Dollar

Issued to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the settlement of New Netherlands, the 1924 Huguenot Walloon Tercentenary Half Dollar was the only commemorative coin released for the year. The following year would see the issuance of coins under four different programs, the greatest number to date, although it would later be exceeded.

The subject of commemoration was the founding of New Netherlands, now New York, by a group of Dutch colonists in 1624. A church group known as the Huguenot-Walloon New Netherland Commission sought the commemorative coin program, which was eventually approved. There was some controversy about the role of government in creating a fund raiser  for a private church group, although the program proceeded.

The obverse of the 1924 Huguenot Half Dollar featured portraits of Admiral Coligny and William the Silent. Although they were not involved in the settlement, they were viewed as leaders in the struggle for religious freedom. Inscriptions read “United States of America”, “In God We Trust”, “Huguenot Half Dollar”, and “Coligny – William the Silent”.

An image of the New Nederland is shown on the reverse. This is the ship that brought the settlers to the New World. Inscriptions read “Huguenot-Walloon Tercentenary”, “Founding of New Netherland”, and the anniversary dates “1624” and “1924”. Both the obverse and reverse were designed by George T. Morgan.

A quantity of 300,000 of the 1924 Huguenot-Walloon Tercentenary Half Dollars were authorized. Ultimately, 142,080 pieces were struck at the Philadelphia Mint and distributed for the issue price of $1.

Huguenot Half Dollar Coin Specifications

Designer: George T. Morgan
Composition: 90% silver, 10% copper
Weight: 12.50 grams
Diameter: 30.6 mm
Authorization: Public Law 67-440
Maximum Authorized Mintage: 300,000

Huguenot Half Dollar Mintages

1924: 142,080

PCGS or NGC Huguenot Walloon Half Dollar